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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

most brilliant results. In the solitary passage in which we seem to see a 

smile on the face of the austere poet of the _De Rerum Natura_, Lucretius 

tells us how every lover, however he may be amused by the amorous 

extravagances of other men, is himself blinded by passion: if his mistress 

is black she is a fascinating brunette, if she squints she is the rival of 

Pallas, if too tall she is majestic, if too short she is one of the 

Graces, _tota merum sal_; if too lean it is her delicate refinement, if 

too fat then a Ceres, dirty and she disdains adornment, a chatterer and 

brilliantly vivacious, silent and it is her exquisite modesty.[66] Sixteen 

hundred years later Robert Burton, when describing the symptoms of love, 

made out a long and appalling list of the physical defects which the lover 

is prepared to admire.[67] 

 

Yet we must not be too certain that the lover is wrong in this matter. We 

too hastily assume that the casual and hasty judgment of the world is 

necessarily more reliable, more conformed to what we call "truth," than 

the judgment of the lover which is founded on absorbed and patient study. 

In some cases where there is lack of intelligence in the lover and 

dissimulation in the object of his love, it may be so. But even a poem or 

a picture will often not reveal its beauty except by the expenditure of 

time and study. It is foolish to expect that the secret beauty of a human 

person will reveal itself more easily. The lover is an artist, an artist 

who constructs an image, it is true, but only by patient and concentrated 

attention to nature; he knows the defects of his image, probably better 

than anyone, but he knows also that art lies, not in the avoidance of 

defects, but in the realization of those traits which swallow up defects 

and so render them non-existent. A great artist, Rodin, after a life spent 

in the study of Nature, has declared that for art there is no ugliness in 

Nature. "I have arrived at this belief by the study of Nature," he said; 

"I can only grasp the beauty of the soul by the beauty of the body, but 

some day one will come who will explain what I only catch a glimpse of and 

will declare how the whole earth is beautiful, and all human beings 

beautiful. I have never been able to say this in sculpture so well as I 

wish and as I feel it affirmed within me. For poets Beauty has always 

been some particular landscape, some particular woman; but it should be 

all women, all landscapes. A negro or a Mongol has his beauty, however 

remote from ours, and it must be the same with their characters. There is 

no ugliness. When I was young I made that mistake, as others do; I could 

not undertake a woman's bust unless I thought her pretty, according to my 

particular idea of beauty; to-day I should do the bust of any woman, and 

it would be just as beautiful. And however ugly a woman may look, when she 

is with her lover she becomes beautiful; there is beauty in her character, 

in her passions, and beauty exists as soon as character or passion becomes 

visible, for the body is a casting on which passions are imprinted. And 

even without that, there is always the blood that flows in the veins and 

the air that fills the lungs."[68] 

 

The saint, also, is here at one with the lover and the artist. The man who 


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Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 4
A Modern Love Story by H. G. Wells
Plain Facts for Old and Young by John Harvey Kellogg
Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 3
Harris's List of Covent Garden Ladies + The Ladies Book of Useful Information
Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 1
Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 2
Sketches of the Fair Sex, in All Parts of the World + Three Contributions to the Theory of Sex
In Defense of Women + The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana
Private Sex Advice to Women + The Sex Life of the Gods
Woman
Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 6 part 1
Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 6 part 2